Breaking Out of the Classroom

 

This program provides grants for courses with a significant element outside of the classroom, including off campus. This often entails partnering with local institutions as part of course instruction. Grants help pay the costs of partner institutions as well as transportation, equipment, and other expenses.

Please view the application process here.

Community partners may include (but are not limited to) cultural, governmental, non-profit, and grassroots organizations. We seek to promote dialogue, exchange, and collaboration between UC San Diego and the greater San Diego community. Collaboration and partnership is based on values including relationship-building, reciprocity, and mutual benefit; participation, transparency, and reflection; innovation, integration, and dialogue; cultural diversity and social equality.

Some examples of “Breaking Out of the Classroom” include:

 

A History of Seafaring in the Age of Sail

This is an upper-division undergraduate seminar conceptualized and conceived by Mark Hanna, Associate Professor in the Department of History, which focuses on life at sea from the age of discovery to the advent of the steamship. Students in the course receive hands-on experience by sailing the Californian, the official tall ship of California, thanks to a partnership with Ray Ashley, Director of the San Diego Maritime Museum and a UC San Diego alumnus. Last year, students sailed the San Salvador, a replica of the Spanish galleon that first sailed into San Diego harbor in 1542. The class also explores the rare print and manuscript materials held in UC San Diego’s Special Collections Library including never-before-studied original logbooks produced by seafaring captains on the high seas during the 1800s.

Race and Oral History in San Diego

This project links students, faculty, and the UC San Diego library with community organizations, institutions, and individuals in Chicana/o, Latina/o, African American and Asian American communities in San Diego to produce undergraduate courses, oral histories, and archives devoted to the racial and ethnic history of our campus, city and surrounding area. Professors Luis Alvarez and Simeon Man of the History Department and Professor Yen Espiritu in Ethnic Studies are leading the project.